Monday, 16 March 2009

FACING THE STORMS

Jesus calms the storm
As evening came, Jesus said to his disciples, “Let’s cross to the other side of the lake.” So they took Jesus in the boat and started out, leaving the crowds behind (although other boats followed). But soon a fierce storm came up. High waves were breaking into the boat, and it began to fill with water.
Jesus was sleeping at the back of the boat with his head on a cushion. The disciples woke him up, shouting, “Teacher, don’t you care that we’re going to drown?”
When Jesus woke up, he rebuked the wind and said to the waves, “Silence! Be still!” Suddenly the wind stopped, and there was a great calm. Then he asked them, “Why are you afraid? Do you still have no faith?”
The disciples were absolutely terrified. “Who is this man?” they asked each other. “Even the wind and waves obey him!”


Mark 4:35-41

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JESUS, LOVER OF MY SOUL



Jesus, lover of my soul,


let me to thy bosom fly,


while the nearer waters roll,


while the tempest still is high.


Hide me, O my Savior, hide,


till the storm of life is past;


safe into the haven guide;


O receive my soul at last.




Other refuge have I none,


hangs my helpless soul on thee;


leave, ah! leave me not alone,


still support and comfort me.


All my trust on thee is stayed,


all my help from thee I bring;


cover my defenseless head


with the shadow of thy wing.




Wilt Thou not regard my call?


Wilt Thou not accept my prayer?


Lo! I sink, I faint, I fall—


Lo! on Thee I cast my care:


Reach me out Thy gracious hand!


While I of Thy strength receive,


Hoping against hope I stand,


Dying, and, behold, I live!



Charles Wesley


The circumstance of the writing of this hymn is interesting. The story goes that Charles Wesley was roused from his sleep one night by a terrible storm. Being unable to rest he got up, put on his dressing-gown, and, opening his casement window stood looking out upon the stormy scene. Suddenly a bird, exhausted by the wind, and hotly pursued by a hawk, flew through the open window right into Charles Wesley's breast for protection. Having saved the bird and placed it in security, he turned to his desk and wrote this immortal hymn, so realistic and descriptive of the fear and intense longing of the anxious soul to find safety and rest.

1 comment:

Tony said...

Lovely